Aurora Sporealis 2018

Department Head Letter 2018

Department Head Letter 2018 from Jim Bradeen

This department, our alumni, friends, and donors continue to deliver impacts that change people’s lives and feed the world. In addition to reading this issue of the Aurora Sporealis, hear about what the department has accomplished this year from Department Head Jim Bradeen.

Department Head Letter 2018  >>

International Research Highlights: 2018

International research on wheat stem rust

Learn about two research projects having an impact internationally. We highlight Ben Lockhart's project investigating Maize Lethal Necrosis in Eastern African, and Pablo Olivera's project investigating Ug99 in Ethiopia, Germany and Kazakhstan.

International Research Highlights: 2018 >>

The Plant Disease Clinic: Origins and Evolution

The Plant Disease Clinic: Origins and Evolution Story in the Aurora Sporealis

The Plant Disease Clinic (PDC) has operated for 62 years under several formats and leadership styles. The common denominator, throughout time, is that the PDC offers public access to the myriad of expertise residing in the department. 

The Plant Disease Clinic: Origins and Evolution >>

Identifying Potential Biological Controls for White Nose Syndrome

Identifying Potential Biological Controls for White Nose Syndrome

Liam Genter's work aims to identify potential biocontrol agents from the native microbial community of bat hibernacula and develop biocontrol based strategies to combat White Nose Syndrome of bats. 

Identifying Potential Biological Controls for White Nose Syndrome >>

Detecting Plant Diseases Earlier Using Hyperspectral Imaging

Detecting Plant Diseases Earlier Using Hyperspectral Imaging

Assistant Professor Cory Hirsch is using hyperspectral imaging to detect diseases such as sudden death syndrome (SDS)  and brown stem rot, that affect farmers’ soybean yields, earlier before the naked eye can see them.

Detecting Plant Diseases Using Hyperspectral Imaging >>

Studying the Ecology of a Fungal Species in the Amazon Rainforest

Studying the Ecology of a Rhizomorphic Fungal Species in the Amazon Rainforest Aurora Sporealis Story

Hear from Cristina Toapanta about her research challenge to unveil the role of a fungus found throughout the rainforest in Yasuní National Park in Ecuador, its role in nutrient cycling in this ecosystem, and to what extent it is involved in the death of several tree species.

Studying the Ecology of a Fungal Species in the Amazon Rainforest >>

My Plant Path: Robert Alvarez-Quinto

My Plant Path: Robert Alvarez-Quinto

For Robert Alvarez-Quinto, farmers in his home country of Ecuador are who first inspired his journey to plant pathology, who motivate him each day during his studies, and who he is driven to bring research-based agricultural solutions to in the future.

My Plant Path: Robert Alvarez-Quinto >>

Thank You Donors!

Thank you to all our recent donors

With your support we are able to pursue ground-breaking research, develop science-based solutions, and train the next generation of plant pathology leaders. 

Thank You Donors >>

My Plant Path: Kristi Ledman

Kristi Ledman My Plant Path

After deciding that an undergraduate degree in clothing design was not for her and then spending ten years in the workforce, Kristi Ledman finally discovered her passion for plant pathology when she returned to the University of Minnesota.

My Plant Path: Kristi Ledman >>

View Past Editions of the Aurora Sporealis

Plant Pathology Past Aurora Sporealis

The Aurora Sporealis has been published since 1924, and all editions are available digitally.

View Past Editions of the Aurora Sporealis>>

Early Career Alumni: Where are they now?

Early Career Alumni: Where are they now?

Catch-up with these early career alumni to learn about their current role, their transition from life in the department to their role, and how the department helped prepare them for success.

Early Career Alumni: Where are they now? >>